Posts Tagged ‘write a book’

‘How Can I Write My Book Faster?’ – A Quick and Easy Guide

June 24, 2013

Words I often hear from clients are these: “I’m slow at writing and frequently get stuck. I wish I had a magic want to enable me to concentrate on writing and improving and work faster!”

This is an incredibly common problem – slow writing and getting stuck – even for experienced authors. This is because self-doubt creeps in for so many writers and they start wondering if they are writing a ‘good enough’ book.

The trick is to set aside thinking time and to plan out your book out before you start writing. I strongly recommend you do this for any type of book. This is because it’s so much easier to alter a one-page outline than a 300-page book if you suddenly decide your hero should be a heroine or that your book should be written in first person rather than third person!

Jeffrey Archer, for example, lays down on his bed for a while before starting his writing each day. This helps separate from his daily life and allows him to submerge in his fictional world.

It might feel slightly uncomfortable setting aside ‘thinking time’ as you may feel like you’re doing ‘nothing’ or may be keen to get cracking with writing your book. But it really is worth setting aside time for planning before you get started and even when your book is underway.

You can plan out your book in a simple way using post-it notes and a series of bullet points. Or you can do it more comprehensively. Barbara Taylor Bradford wrote a 100-page outline before she event started ‘A Woman of Substance’ for example. John Gray (author of ‘Men are From Mars, Women Are From Venus), on the other hand, always tries out his ideas for at least a year on his clients before putting them in his books.

Conflict is the motor that drives any plot. So, if at any point, you are wondering why your story has ground to a halt, just think of a fresh challenge for your characters to get the story rolling again. This can be a small internal challenge, such as conflict in a character’s mind, or it can be a much more dramatic external conflict.

The same applies to non-fiction books. If your plot grinds to a standstill, ask yourself if there are enough challenges, problems or conflicts to be overcome.

Also try to set yourself a writing target each day if you can – such as 1000 words or 3000 words. A standard book is approximately 70,000 words in length. So by setting yourself a target of say, 1500 words, you will reach your goal in under 28 days. This will give you a solid first draft that you can then edit and re-edit to your satisfaction.

I have a number of clients who have written their entire books in two to five days using this approach. However, one of the wonderful things about breaking down a book into a 28-day writing plan is that the ‘impossible’ suddenly seems much more achievable. You’re not trying to tackle the mountain in one go which would be exhausting. You have a clear strategy – with achievable daily goals – that will get you to where you want to be.

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Do get my FREE guide ‘How to Write A Six Figure Book and Why Most Writers Get This Wrong’ at http://www.millionaireauthorsbootcamp.com/report

I’ll also be uploading my new FREE guide ‘How To Sell a Million Copies of Your Book: 7 Strategies You Can Use Today’ in the next couple of weeks.

 

How To Sell Millions of Books (Alternatively Titled: My Reckless Gambling Streak!)

April 16, 2013

I was wondering how to motivate one of my clients to finish his book, as life and work seemed to keep getting in his way. So I recklessly said: “Let’s have a bet: let’s see if you can finish your book before I finish mine.”

Before I knew it, we’d agreed that I would roll up my sleeves and hand-wash his car if he finishes first.

And so, ‘Millionaire Authors: The Secret To Selling Over A Million Books’ was conceived.

I set myself the goal of finishing it within 4 weeks and launching it in the autumn to coincide with this year’s Millionaire Bootcamp for Authors from 1st to 3rd November.

Everything seemed to be going smoothly at the start. ‘This bet is going to be a doddle,’ I thought. Never mind that my client owns a dog that sheds fur and drools, and leaves muddy footprints on his car upholstery. I only have about 10 hours of interviews to do, and maybe another 2 hours writing the introduction. And my car could do with a good clean after so many school runs with my kids.

Except that I’ve been hitting one or two unexpected snags…

So far, I’ve contacted over 60 bestselling authors and their agents, requesting interviews. And I’ve received almost as many rejections along the way.

I’d like to interview 12 millionaire authors for my book. So far, ‘in the bag’ as it were, I have:

Jeffrey Archer, ‘Kane & Abel’ – 250 million copies sold;
John Gray, ‘Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus’ – 50 million copies sold;
Sir Terry Pratchett – ‘Discworld’ series – 85 million copies sold;
Eric Carle, ‘The Hungry Caterpillar’ – 30 million sold;
Alexander McCall Smith, ‘No1 Ladies Detective Agency’ – £40m sold;
Joanne Harris, ‘Chocolat’, £21 million sold.

To achieve this, I’ve had to contact – and receive rejections from – a list of celebrities and authors who include:

  • J K Rowling
  • Dan Brown
  • Jacqueline Wilson
  • Danielle Steel
  • John Grisham
  • James Patterson
  • Bill Bryson
  • Patricia Cornwell
  • Ian Rankin
  • Julia Donaldson
  • Francesca Simon
  • Martina Cole
  • Philip Pullman
  • Stephenie Meyer
  • Delia Smith
  • Stephen King
  • Marian Keyes
  • Josephine Cox
  • Sophie Kinsella
  • Jodi Picoult
  • Terry Deary
  • Anthony Horowitz
  • Ian McEwan
  • Wilbur Smith
  • Sebastian Faulks
  • Helen Fielding
  • Lee Child
  • Dave Pelzer
  • Mark Haddon
  • Joanna Trollope
  • Jackie Collins
  • Louis de Bernières
  • Jack Higgins
  • Anita Shreve
  • Robert Harris
  • Frank McCourt
  • Salman Rushdie
  • Robert Allen
  • Anthony Robbins
  • Louise Hay
  • Lynne Truss
  • Robert Kyosaki
  • Bob Proctor
  • Deepak Chopra
  • Brian Tracy
  • Marianne Williamson
  • Mark Victor Hansen
  • Malcolm Gladwell
  • Khaled Hosseini
  • Ken Follet
  • Tim Ferris
  • Eckhart Tolle
  • Marci Schimoff
  • Joe Vitale

In other words, only 10 per cent of the people I’ve contacted have agreed to be interviewed. So it’s likely I’ll need to contact another 60+ authors to find another 6 writers who’ll agree to be interviewed!

When I was little, my mother told me the fable of ‘The Hare and The Tortoise’. If you’ve never read it before, it’s a story of how persistence and determination allows a slow tortoise to win a race – even when the competition (the hare) is a much faster sprinter. Mum told me the fable when I was a kid. She said: “What matters is that you keep plodding on right until the very end. Often it’s the plodders who are the winners!”

That lesson always stuck with me: that persistence and determination often win the day. If you want something badly enough, you just have to work for it. There’s no point whining or complaining. You just dust yourself down and get on with it.

Or, in my case, you prepare to roll up your sleeves grab a sponge, and get covered in dog hairs and soap suds.

I’ll keep you updated with how the bet is coming along in blogs that follow…

In the meantime, remember to block out the 1st to 3rd November in your diary for The Millionaire Bootcamp for Authors: I’m already lining up some fantastic speakers!

I’ll be releasing full details shortly at: http://www.millionaireauthorsbootcamp.com.

The Secrets To Selling Millions of Books

The Secrets To Selling Millions of Books

‘All Publishers Are Idiots!’

January 13, 2010

Imagine walking up to a stranger in the street… and asking for £1K.

“I’m going to the races,” you say. “When I come back I’ll have doubled or even tripled your money. Hell, I might even surprise you and make a cool million.”

Do you think he or she is doing to hand over the money? Erm. Tough one, but probably not.

Ok, this is the type of letter that I regularly receive in my mail box and I never know whether to laugh or cry:

“What iswrong with the publishing industry is they are stale, they won’t tyake a chance with none published writers. I have never had a bad letter about my writings only (enjoyed your book good luck) or words to that efect. If they enjoy my stories (children’s stories) why not take a chance!?!”

Shall I answer or would you like to?

Why do publishers and agents reject books? Hmm. Tricky.